Our 2016-2017 Metrics (Data and Summatives)

Below you will find information on the metrics required for our teachers at each grade level. All of the following data should be tracked with our Mississippi Math Tracker. Any questions? Leave a comment or email Ethan directly.

NOTE: All grades and math contents have the following Culture of Achievement Goal (also trackable in the online trackers): 40% increase in net positive responses from student survey result region wide.

5th-8th Grade Mathematics

  • Required Ongoing Data:
    1. Content Mastery
      • What: A content mastery tracker aligned to the Common Core State Standards for Math (CCSS-M). Tracker should demonstrate student proficiency for each completed CCSS-M content standard.
      • Why: All Mississippi students in grades 5-8 will be assessed on CCSS-M content standards in the state QUESTAR assessment in Q4. Since the QUESTAR assessment is based on CCSS-M, students deserve to know their progress relative to these standards (as opposed to just generalized mastery of teacher-created assessments). This information is also paramount for teachers to adequately respond to data for their students and in our yearlong sequence of professional development.
    2. Performance Tasks
      • What: A PT tracker with student results rated based on the QUASAR (or other approved) rubric.
      • Why: Performance Tasks aligned to the Standards of Mathematical Practice are an integral part of Mississippi’s QUESTAR assessment. PTs are also an integral part of all modern, internationally benchmarked standards and require a depth of design and student feedback around mathematical thinking that sets them apart from simple content mastery.
  • Summative Expectations:
    • Summative Assessment: Because our teachers have often not received their MAP data, teachers must have a plan for how they will collect cumulative student data aligned to the grade-level standards. This often takes the form of a final MAP-aligned practice test that students will take in Q3 or Q4. Because this varies year to year and school to school, teachers must be proactive in discussing this with their schools and sharing this information with their coach. If the school is not conducting a test that aligns to the entirety of MAP, then teachers must plan to conduct their own Summative. We recommend using a QUESTAR practice test or an MDE testlet in these situations.
    • Goal Expectations: The “high-performing” benchmark for state-tested classes is 40% gap closure. In previous years this would be based off of closing state test data by 40% between your students and a  high-performing “pacesetter” district in Mississippi. Because this is the first year of the QUESTAR assessment, we are still awaiting confirmation about how to best calculate gap closure given this shift.

Algebra I

  • Required Ongoing Data:
    1. Content Mastery
      • What: A content mastery tracker aligned to the Common Core State Standards for Math (CCSS-M). Tracker should demonstrate student proficiency for each completed CCSS-M content standard.
      • Why: All Mississippi students in Algebra I will be assessed on CCSS-M content standards in the state QUESTAR assessment in Q4. Since the QUESTAR assessment is based on CCSS-M, students deserve to know their progress relative to these standards (as opposed to just generalized mastery of teacher-created assessments). This information is also paramount for teachers to adequately respond to data for their students and in our yearlong sequence of professional development.
    2. Performance Tasks
      • What: A PT tracker with student results rated based on the QUASAR (or other approved) rubric.
      • Why: Performance Tasks aligned to the Standards of Mathematical Practice are an integral part of Mississippi’s QUESTAR assessment. PTs are also an integral part of all modern, internationally benchmarked standards and require a depth of design and student feedback around mathematical thinking that sets them apart from simple content mastery.
  • Summative Expectations:
      • Summative Assessment: Because our teachers have often not received their MAP data, teachers must have a plan for how they will collect cumulative student data aligned to the grade-level standards. This often takes the form of a final MAP-aligned practice test that students will take in Q3 or Q4. Because this varies year to year and school to school, teachers must be proactive in discussing this with their schools and sharing this information with their coach. If the school is not conducting a test that aligns to the entirety of MAP, then teachers must plan to conduct their own Summative. We recommend using a QUESTAR practice test or an MDE testlet in these situations.
    • Goal Expectations: The “high-performing” benchmark for state-tested classes is 40% gap closure. In previous years this would be based off of closing state test data by 40% between your students and a  high-performing “pacesetter” district in Mississippi. Because this is the first year of the QUESTAR assessment, we are still awaiting confirmation about how to best calculate gap closure given this shift.

Algebra II

  • Required Ongoing Data (preferred Common Core alignment):
    1. Content Mastery
      • What: A content mastery tracker aligned to the Common Core State Standards for Math (CCSS-M). Tracker should demonstrate student proficiency for each completed CCSS-M content standard.
      • Why: Although Mississippi has opted out of a statewide assessment (previously with PARCC and now with QUESTAR),  Algebra II Common Core standards are still the benchmark for most high-performing classrooms across the country. Since instruction (and the state guidelines for this course) is still based on CCSS-M, students deserve to know their progress relative to these standards (as opposed to just generalized mastery of teacher-created assessments). This information is also paramount for teachers to adequately respond to data for their students and in our yearlong sequence of professional development.
    2. Performance Tasks
      • What: A PT tracker with student results rated based on the QUASAR (or other approved) rubric.
      • Why: Performance Tasks are integral to assessing student understanding of the Common Core Math Practice Standards. PTs are also an integral part of all modern, internationally benchmarked standards and require a depth of design and student feedback around mathematical thinking that sets them apart from simple content mastery. Finally, the sort of problem-solving necessary with PTs prepares students for the high cognitive-demand tasks that they would encounter in college-level mathematics courses.
  • Summative Expectations (for preferred Common Core alignment):
    • Summative Assessment: The regional Algebra II CCSSM-aligned summative will be administered by all teachers EOY. This is often used as the Q4 “nine weeks test” that teachers are required to give at most schools.
    • Goal Expectations: 80% mastery on the regional Algebra II Summative.
  • Less Preferred Data and Goals: Because Mississippi has opted out of the PARCC assessment for this content, Algebra II teachers may choose to use ACT growth as a metric (in addition to CCSSM-aligned goals or as a replacement). For this option, see “ACT Option” below.

Geometry

  • Required Ongoing Data (preferred Common Core alignment):
    1. Content Mastery
      • What: A content mastery tracker aligned to the Common Core State Standards for Math (CCSS-M). Tracker should demonstrate student proficiency for each completed CCSS-M content standard.
      • Why: Although Mississippi has opted out of a statewide assessment (previously with PARCC and now with QUESTAR),  Geometry Common Core standards are still the benchmark for most high-performing classrooms across the country. Since instruction (and the state guidelines for this course) is still based on CCSS-M, students deserve to know their progress relative to these standards (as opposed to just generalized mastery of teacher-created assessments). This information is also paramount for teachers to adequately respond to data for their students and in our yearlong sequence of professional development.
    2. Performance Tasks
      • What: A PT tracker with student results rated based on the QUASAR (or other approved) rubric.
      • Why: Performance Tasks are integral to assessing student understanding of the Common Core Math Practice Standards. PTs are also an integral part of all modern, internationally benchmarked standards and require a depth of design and student feedback around mathematical thinking that sets them apart from simple content mastery. Finally, the sort of problem-solving necessary with PTs prepares students for the high cognitive-demand tasks that they would encounter in college-level mathematics courses.
  • Summative Expectations (for preferred Common Core alignment):
    • Summative Assessment: The regional Geometry CCSSM-aligned summative will be administered by all teachers EOY. This is often used as the Q4 “nine weeks test” that teachers are required to give at most schools.
    • Goal Expectations: 80% mastery on the regional Algebra II Summative.
  • Less Preferred Data and Goals: Because Mississippi has opted out of the PARCC assessment for this content, Geometry teachers may choose to use ACT growth as a metric (in addition to CCSSM-aligned goals or as a replacement). For this option, see “ACT Option” below.

9th Grade Remedial Mathematics

  • Required Ongoing Data:
    1. Content Mastery
      • What: A content mastery tracker aligned to the Common Core State Standards for Math (CCSS-M). Tracker should demonstrate student proficiency for each completed CCSS-M content standard.
      • Why: All Mississippi students in grades 5-8 and in Algebra I will be assessed on CCSS-M content standards in the state QUESTAR assessment in Q4. Since the QUESTAR assessment is based on CCSS-M, students deserve to know their progress relative to these standards (as opposed to just generalized mastery of teacher-created assessments). This information is also paramount for teachers to adequately respond to data for their students and in our yearlong sequence of professional development.
    2. Performance Tasks
      • What: A PT tracker with student results rated based on the QUASAR (or other approved) rubric.
      • Why: Performance Tasks aligned to the Standards of Mathematical Practice are an integral part of Mississippi’s QUESTAR assessment. PTs are also an integral part of all modern, internationally benchmarked standards and require a depth of design and student feedback around mathematical thinking that sets them apart from simple content mastery.
  • Summative Expectations:
    • Summative Assessment: A CCSSM-aligned Summative assessment that assesses each CCSS-M standard for students’ grade level or for this particular class. We recommend using a QUESTAR practice test or an MDE testlet in these situations. Would you like to collaborate with other teachers in creating a rigorous summative for our region? Email Ethan!
    • Goal Expectations: The “high-performing” benchmark for state-tested classes is 40% gap closure. In previous years this would be based off of closing state test data by 40% between your students and a  high-performing “pacesetter” district in Mississippi. Because this is the first year of the PARCC assessment, we are still awaiting confirmation about how to best calculate gap closure given this shift.

Additional Contents

Precalculus: You should use a goal of 80% mastery on our summative assessment. You may also choose to set a goal on the ACT; if you do this, you should aim for at least an average score of 21.0 (college ready). See also Problem Attic for items from other states and tests.

Trigonometry: You should use a goal of 80% mastery on our summative assessment. You may also choose to set a goal on the ACT; if you do this, you should aim for at least an average score of 21.0 (college ready). See also Problem Attic for items from other states and tests.

Calculus: For a non-AP class, you should set a goal of an average score of AT LEAST a 2.3 on a released AP test. We are waiting for national guidance on the high-performing benchmark for AP classes; it will either be an average score of 3.0 or 4.0. Find the materials for the test here. See also Problem Attic for items from other states and tests.

Statistics: For a non-AP class, you should set a goal of an average score of AT LEAST a 2.4 on a released AP test. We are waiting for national guidance on the high-performing benchmark for AP classes; it will either be an average score of 3.0 or 4.0. Find the materials for the test here. See also Problem Attic for items from other states and tests.

Don’t see your content listed above? Email Ethan or leave a comment below!

ACT Option

The national “high-performing benchmark” for ACT growth within Teach For America is an average growth of 3 points. However, we have seen in Mississippi that students start classes further behind than their national peers, making larger growth both more essential, and more feasible. We suggest you set a goal of 5 points of growth and/or a minimum score of 21 (college ready).

The ACT EXPLORE test is aligned to the ACT, but is recommended for use with 8th and 9th graders. Depending on your students’ diagnostic scores, a goal of 3 points growth is most likely an appropriate goal on this test. You can find released ACT EXPLORE tests here. We are currently researching scoring guidelines.

If you are using an ACT growth goal, you should buy an ACT study guide that contains multiple practice tests. So long as you consistently use tests created by the same publishing companies, we consider these to be valid assessments. If your book does not have a conversion guide for scores, you should use the formula 0.575*(# correct) + 1.5, rounding to the nearest half point.

The full ACT requires 60 minutes to administer, but most classes do not last this long. You can choose your own testing conditions (giving students 30 minutes each over two days, or 40 minutes and then 20 minutes, etc.). Just ensure you use the same testing conditions each time you give the test so your growth data is valid.

You can find released ACT items (useful for planning purposes) here. The ACT has also released extensive guides about connecting the ACT’s “college readiness standards” to your classroom. They have separate guides for the ACTPLAN, and EXPLORE.

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